Baseball steroid era statistics

Enter the Senate. Considering the glacial pace of federal legislative activity, perhaps politicians view anything that enhances performance with alarm and distrust. Still, the Senate hearing was a classic exercise in overkill, even if the nation wasn’t in the midst of a war on terror, a lingering economic slowdown and serious accounting scandals rotting our 401(k)s. Arranged by Byron Dorgan (Democrat, North Dakota), chairman of the . Senate Subcommittee on Consumer Affairs, Foreign Commerce and Tourism, the hearing resulted in predictable displays of finger wagging, head shaking and big juicy red herrings. Our tax dollars at work.

Which made Canseco’s second benefactor — Mike Wallace — all the more important. John Hamlin, a producer at 60 Minutes , had gotten a tip about Canseco’s book from a friend at another network. (The friend couldn’t act on it because his employer was a Major League Baseball rights holder.) Hamlin began calling baseball people and confirming the details. Almost no one would talk on the record, but they suggested that Canseco’s account was true. One of the few allegations Hamlin couldn’t verify was Canseco’s insistence that Roger Clemens was juicing.

The Mitchell Report also stated that interviews were requested of five MLB players who had spoken out publicly on the steroid issue. Of these players, only one, Frank Thomas , was willing to be interviewed. The Mitchell Report stated that there was no evidence that any of these five had used performance-enhancing drugs. Curt Schilling , one of the four players who declined to interview with Mitchell, explained that he denied Mitchell's request because he "would have nothing to offer" Mitchell's investigation "other than personal opinion and hypotheticals." [6]

Baseball steroid era statistics

baseball steroid era statistics

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