Corticosteroid-induced psychosis

It Should Be Emphasized that Dosage Requirements are Variable and Must Be Individualized on the Basis of the Disease Under Treatment and the Response of the Patient. After a favorable response is noted, the proper maintenance dosage should be determined by decreasing the initial drug dosage in small decrements at appropriate time intervals until the lowest dosage which will maintain an adequate clinical response is reached. Situations which may make dosage adjustments necessary are changes in clinical status secondary to remissions or exacerbations in the disease process, the patient's individual drug responsiveness, and the effect of patient exposure to stressful situations not directly related to the disease entity under treatment. In this latter situation it may be necessary to increase the dosage of the corticosteroid for a period of time consistent with the patient's condition. If after long-term therapy the drug is to be stopped, it is recommended that it be withdrawn gradually rather than abruptly.

Dexamethasone is absorbed rapidly after oral administration with a half-life of about 190 minutes. Sufficient absorption may occur after topical application to the skin and eye to produce systemic effects. In plasma dexamethasone protein binding is less than for most other corticosteroids. Corticosteroids diffuse into tissue fluids and cerebrospinal fluid but transplacental diffusion in significant amounts has not been demonstrated. Corticosteroids are metabilised in the liver the kidney and excrete in the urine. Metabolism is similar to other corticosteroids. Intraocular penetration occurs in significant amounts and contributes to the effectiveness of dexamethasone in anterior segment inflammatory disease.

Corticosteroid-induced psychosis

corticosteroid-induced psychosis

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