Non steroid inhalers

5mg a day was too much and he was having bad side effects, extreme lethargy, he stopped eating,and drinking and his diarrhea actually got worse. Half a pill ever other day was not enough his stool was normal the first day then back to diarrhea the second. Half a pill mg a day seems to be the formula that works for him. He tolerates it well,and his stool remains normal. Mischief is much more active and healthy now,and is actually gaining weight. I am very pleased. Like I said I think it saved his life. Also the drug is very inexpensive $10 bucks a month

Weeks ago Breo Ellipta , a combination corticosteroid and long acting beta agonist (Laba) inhaler became available by prescription for control of asthma in those age 18 or older. Currently a 100 microgram strength (based on the inhaled steroid component) is available, but a higher 200 mcg is on the way. Breo Ellipta also contains a fluticasone derivative (same as Arnuity Ellipta) similar to Flovent and Advair. The Laba in Breo Ellipta is vilanterol and is completely different from salmeterol, which is the Laba in Advair. Breo Ellipta has a box warning, as does Advair and other similar combination inhalers because of the Laba component.

This confusing situation happens often, even when the rescue and maintenance inhalers are of different color. The root problem is lack of standardization among inhalers, with unclear labeling to distinguish between rescue and maintenance inhalers. A contributing cause is lack of proper education for both the caregivers and their patients . All too often proper instructions were not given when the drug was first prescribed. And even when they are provided, patients sometimes don't really understand, or they forget. Either way, having similar inhalers for different purposes is an invitation to error. (This was less likely to be a problem when the drug was studied by the drug companies; see YELLOW BOX above, under 'DPI Type 2'.) The problem is compounded when patients are on multiple inhalers, eg, Proventil for rescue, Advair and Spiriva for maintenance. That's 3 separate devices with two different purposes -- easy for the patient to get confused. (Pills and capsules come in many colors and sizes, but they are all swallowed the same way.) What's needed is a universal delivery device for all inhalers, with perhaps just two colors: red for rescue drugs and green for maintenance drugs. Anyone with clinical interest in the inhaler problems discussed above (Errors 1 & 2) should definitely read Problems With Inhaler Use: A Call for Improved Clinician and Patient Education , by James B. Fink and Bruck K. Rubin (Respiratory Care, Sept 2005, Vol 50, No. 10, pages 1360-75). 3. Not checking some objective measurement of the patient's air flow obstruction. Every patient should have a breathing test to ascertain the degree of impairment caused by the asthma. The most frequently performed test is 'spirometry', which takes just a few minutes and requires the patient to exhale forcefully thru a testing device (shown below).
A patient performing the spirometry test


Graphs from a normal spirometry test; left panel, graph of flow vs. volume; right panel, graph of time vs. volume.

After reading this article I thought I should comment and let people know there is a brand new personal home spirometer called Spiro PD which empowers people with asthma to monitor their lung function and enhances compliance and medication adherence. Spiro PD has a built in medication tracker which has alarms that remind patients when to take their medications. The software has a real time stamp so they or their doctor can go back and view their medication and lung function history. Because it alerts you of a fluctuating lung function before you actually feel symptoms, it lets you know if you are responding to treatment and helps you take only the right dose at the right time.

Non steroid inhalers

non steroid inhalers

After reading this article I thought I should comment and let people know there is a brand new personal home spirometer called Spiro PD which empowers people with asthma to monitor their lung function and enhances compliance and medication adherence. Spiro PD has a built in medication tracker which has alarms that remind patients when to take their medications. The software has a real time stamp so they or their doctor can go back and view their medication and lung function history. Because it alerts you of a fluctuating lung function before you actually feel symptoms, it lets you know if you are responding to treatment and helps you take only the right dose at the right time.

Media:

non steroid inhalersnon steroid inhalersnon steroid inhalersnon steroid inhalersnon steroid inhalers

http://buy-steroids.org