Pancreatitis in dogs caused by steroids

The mainstay of pancreatitis treatment is aggressive, supportive care including intravenous fluids, antibiotics, anti-nausea and anti-vomiting drugs, and pain medication. Another aspect of treatment may involve “resting” the stomach and intestines to give them time to heal and rebound. Your veterinarian may recommend withholding food and water until the pet is no longer vomiting . During that time, the patient can receive fluids by injection; some veterinarians provide additional nutrition through intravenous feeding (directly into a vein) or placement of a feeding tube. If the pet does not respond to medical treatment, there are also surgical procedures to treat pancreatitis.

With rabbit, venison and bison being the most lean in pet foods (surprisingly, raw chicken diets by Nature’s Variety are higher in fat; I believe it’s the amount of skin that must get ground in), I took a look at some options to get the fat down to about 10% dry matter.  Remember that with a lower fat diet, you have to feed more to get the same amount of calories, especially for an active dog like Max.  So the following are just suggestions for you to follow up on, considering your dog’s caloric needs and the ingredients involved:


Causes

Pancreatitis has different potential underlying medical causes. Some of these causes might include:

Acute hepatic porphyrias
Autoimmune pancreatitis
Certain medications
Elevated calcium levels in the blood (hypercalcemia)
Hereditary pancreatitis
High triglycerides (hypertriglyceridemia)
Pancreas divisum (congenital malformation)
Small blood vessel inflammation (vasculitis) in the pancreas
Trauma (abdomen or other location)
Viral infections (mumps and other coxsackieviruses, for instance)


Diagnosis and Treatment

Diagnosis of pancreatitis is done by a doctor or other medical professional. Generally, two out of three distinguishing features should be present for a diagnosis: abdominal pain distinct in acute pancreatitis, CT scan distinguishing features, and blood lipase and/or amylase levels greater than three times the upper normal limit.

Pancreatitis treatment depends upon factors such as the patient, the severity and stage of the pancreatitis, as well as others. Pain relievers may be given for symptomatic treatment. Fluids and salts may be replaced by IV in some cases. Oral intake may be limited in order to avoid potential infections and stimulation of the pancreas. Additionally, complications of the pancreatitis and the treatments given may also be checked.

Our medicine service is led by a team of recognised, accredited Specialists and we aim to provide the best possible care and treatment for your pet in our state-of-the art hospital. Our medicine team works closely with the imaging Specialists who run Willows sophisticated imaging facilities, as well as with expert anaesthesia and analgesia Specialists and 24-hour veterinary and nursing staff , all of whom help to optimise the potential for our patients to make a full and uneventful recovery. We have extensive experience of managing critically ill patients, often with complex medical complaints

Pancreatitis in dogs caused by steroids

pancreatitis in dogs caused by steroids

Our medicine service is led by a team of recognised, accredited Specialists and we aim to provide the best possible care and treatment for your pet in our state-of-the art hospital. Our medicine team works closely with the imaging Specialists who run Willows sophisticated imaging facilities, as well as with expert anaesthesia and analgesia Specialists and 24-hour veterinary and nursing staff , all of whom help to optimise the potential for our patients to make a full and uneventful recovery. We have extensive experience of managing critically ill patients, often with complex medical complaints

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